Kubernetes

5 Articles

Scaling Kubernetes to Over 4k Nodes and 200k Pods

Unlike Apache Mesos, which can scale up to 10,000 nodes out of the box, scaling Kubernetes is challenging. Kubernetes’ scalability is not just limited to the number of nodes and pods, but several aspects like the number of resources created, the number of containers per pod, the total number of services, and the pod deployment throughput. This post describes some challenges we faced when scaling and how we solved them.

The Hidden Dangers of Terminating K8S Namespaces

Controllers are one of the foundational components of Kubernetes whose job is to constantly monitor (through a control loop) the defined API resources in order to bring the cluster to the desired state. Each controller has a designed purpose that manages the entire lifecycle of a particular component. An important concept to remember with any cloud native technology is that availability is not guaranteed. If a controller was designed to take action when a resource was deleted and the controller was unavailable at that point in time, the intended action would not occur and state would no longer be in sync.

How to Serve 200K Samples per second with Prometheus

I will explain how to build a monitoring system that can retain data for long periods, which can handle up to 200K samples per second. The important point is that all of these processes are realized on one centralized Prometheus and Thanos server.

Security Practices for Multi-Tenant SaaS Applications using Amazon EKS

This technical guide shows you how to securely manage and operate multi-tenant software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications on Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS) clusters.

11 of the Best Open-Source Kubernetes Tools

The incredible community around Kubernetes is constantly sharing tools that help improve the experience of being a Kubernetes developer. Here is my list of the 11 essential tools I keep in my arsenal. I break them down by important categories which ones help me run Kubernetes, test Kubernetes, and — last but not least — have fun in my IDE.